Four Quartets by T.S. Elliot

Print this page
Four Quartets by T.S. Elliot
  • ID: #449
  • Add Favorites
  • Availability: 10 In Stock
  • $9.00
  • See Price

Four Quartets by T.S. Elliot

The last major verse written by Nobel laureate T. S. Eliot, considered by Eliot himself to be his finest work

Four Quartets is a rich composition that expands the spiritual vision introduced in “The Waste Land.” Here, in four linked poems (“Burnt Norton,” “East Coker,” “The Dry Salvages,” and “Little Gidding”), spiritual, philosophical, and personal themes emerge through symbolic allusions and literary and religious references from both Eastern and Western thought. It is the culminating achievement by a man considered the greatest poet of the twentieth century and one of the seminal figures in the evolution of modernism.

“Published in the fiery days of World War II, Four Quartets stands as a testament to the power of poetry amid the chaos of the time. Let the words speak for themselves: “The dove descending breaks the air/With flame of incandescent terror/Of which the tongues declare/The only discharge from sin and error/The only hope, or the despair/Lies in the choice of pyre or pyre–/To be redeemed from fire by fire./Who then devised this torment?/Love/Love is the unfamiliar Name/Behind the hands that wave/The intolerable shirt of flame/Which human power cannot remove./We only live, only suspire/Consumed by either fire or fire

Four Quartets by T.S. Elliot is one of Bill Clinton’s favorite books.